Windows 10 Toast Notification Script updated to version 1.3

Introduction

As the topic suggests; my Windows 10 Toast Notification Script has been updated to version 1.3 and here’s what’s new and delicious. 😀

Note: The screenshot below is intentionally in jibberish (danish). This is to illustrate that all text elements now are customizable through the config file.

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Windows as a Service: Example of fixing Compat Scan errors (A driver is installed that causes stability problems)

Introduction

Sooner or later you will encounter some Compatibility Scan errors with your Windows 10 upgrades.

And if you like me run the Compat Scan prior to the actual Windows 10 upgrade, you will have time to fix these errors before the end-user is aware. Clever, right? 😀

So this post is an example of such and is based on a really simple approach to fixing an incompatible driver. Curious? Read on 🙂

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Managing Microsoft Edge Chromium settings with SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager)

Introduction

The new Microsoft Edge Chromium browser is a real treat, and not too long ago this delicious new browser was deemed ready for testing in the enterprise.

Therefore I figured it would make a decent blog post to give some insights on, how you can manage the new settings using SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager).

I have previously shown how you can install Google Chrome extensions also using SCCM. This post is based on the same approach: https://www.imab.dk/forcefully-deploy-the-windows-defender-google-chrome-extension-using-configuration-manager/

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Send messages across your Windows 10 computers with SCCM and Toast Notifications

Introduction

First off, this is mostly an inspirational post and the script used here is the latest release of my Windows 10 Toast Notification Script.

Secondly, from time to time, I still see people in various forums asking how they can send popup messages to the computers in their environment using SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager).

So I figured it would make a decent and quick blog post, describing how one can do just that using my Windows 10 Toast Notification script.

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Getting started with Security Baselines: Moving from Group Policy to Microsoft Intune

Introduction

Another delicious feature went GA (General Availability) this week: Security Baselines in Microsoft Intune.

The Security Baselines in Intune is the equivalent to what we have done with Group Policy for some years now, and is basically a set of pre-configured Windows settings, which are recommended for the enterprise by Microsoft.

This post is not a typical A-Z guide, but rather a first look into the feature and what initial experiences I had with moving from Security Baselines with Group Policy to Security Baselines with Intune in a Co-management scenario.

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Configure OneDrive Known Folder Move with Administrative Templates in Microsoft Intune

Introduction

Short and sweet: Back in May 2019, Administrative Templates in Intune went from preview to General Availability. Back then the feature was released with a list of 277 settings. Not much, huh?

Today this will be extended by additional 2500 settings and among these will be the ability to configure OneDrive Known Folder Move. Exciting!

While the configuration of OneDrive Known Folder Move using Administrative Templates in Intune is pretty easy and straightforward, I figured it deserved a post here as well.

Also, initially when OneDrive Known Folder Move was introduced, I did this post on the topic: https://www.imab.dk/how-to-enable-onedrive-known-folder-move-using-sccm-system-center-configuration-manager/

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Windows 10 Toast Notification Script Update: Personal greeting and protocol based reboot

Introduction

Short and sweet. My Windows 10 Toast Notification Script have received a minor update. Now being at version 1.2. The changes mentioned in details below.

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Upgrade Windows 10 over the Internet with In-Place Upgrade Task Sequences and ConfigMgr

Introduction

This is not exactly an A-Z guide on the topic, but rather a story of my experiences with upgrading Windows 10 over the Internet with In-Place Upgrade (IPU) Task Sequence using ConfigMgr and how it works in my environment.

I’m using a Cloud Management Gateway (CMG) with enhanced HTTP as well as initially being connected to the on-premises infrastructure with Always On VPN. The VPN in this scenario is a user-initiated tunnel and thus obviously disconnects once the upgrade restarts the computer. It’s not completely without challenges and I will try to cover those during this post.

Curious? Read on 🙂

Oh yeah, seeing I now allow IPU to happen over the Internet, I also created something in Powershell App Deployment Toolkit which extraordinarily warns the user if the upgrade is being initiated from outside the office network. A preview of that in the end of the post 🙂

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Deploy RSAT (Remote Server Administration Tools) for Windows 10 v1903 using SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager) and Powershell

Introduction

Similar to when Windows 10 v1809 was released back in October 2018 and RSAT debuted as “Features on Demand”, the way of installing RSAT continues with the v1903 release.

Back then I did a Powershell script which is able to install and uninstall the RSAT features. I have now rewritten the script to also include Windows 10 v1903.

Find my 1809 post here: https://www.imab.dk/deploy-rsat-remote-server-administration-tools-for-windows-10-v1809-using-sccm-system-center-configuration-manager/

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Almost Modern Driver Management with ConfigMgr and Powershell

Introduction

First off, bear with me here during the intro. I know introductions usually are boring, but I do have a few words to share with you first.

The following is by no means any substitution for any other Modern Driver Management solution out there. This is purely me exploring, learning and sharing that experience with anyone who’s interested. When I find something useful, I usually try to do my own thing for various reasons, but mainly to learn and also for being less dependent on others work and future maintenance plans.

Now, this post is primarily about a Powershell script and how that Powershell script is designed to run on a given device and export the device drivers into your ConfigMgr source file library or locally. In the process, the script is able to create a regular package in ConfigMgr containing those drivers. The post is also about how to use the regular packages for applying drivers, but the script is what took the most of my time 🙂

The idea here is, that you fire up a given device with a given version of Windows (preferably Windows 10) and install ALL the drivers (preferably the latest drivers) and verify that everything works in that combination of  Windows, drivers and hardware model.

Note: Most vendors provide a tool which checks online for latest drivers and gives you option to install those. This is pretty handy when building new drivers for a given computer model.

Now knowing that everything works, this is the drivers you want to apply to future deployments of this computer model, so you run the script and everything is automatically exported and a package in ConfigMgr is created.

In lack of a better name, this is what I call ‘Almost Modern Driver Management‘. 😀

PS. If you’re looking for a truly nifty and ‘modern’ approach, I suggest you head over to SCConfigMgr.com and take a peek at their solutions for both BIOS and drivers.

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