PXE boot your way into Windows AutoPilot and Windows 10 Shared PC

Introduction

This is a continuation of my previous post on Windows AutoPilot for existing devices. This time covering a similar scenario, where I’m PXE booting an existing device (known or unknown to ConfigMgr) into a Windows 10 Shared PC with Windows AutoPilot and Microsoft Intune

Now, the scenario might have many similarities compared to last week, but nevertheless there’s a real purpose with the crazyness. This is about getting started with Windows AutoPilot and giving you inspiration on how to do that. In my environment, it’s a whole lot easier to make the switch into AutoPilot for non-user devices (I bet I’m not alone on this one). That be devices which are shared between users in public spaces and kiosk devices in particular.

Also, devices in this category are quite often not brand new and might even be old repurposed user-devices (hence we cannot ask our reseller to add them into AutoPilot prior to delivery and thus we have to do it ourselves) 🙂

A peek into the AutoPilot Deployment Profiles in my environment

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AutoPilot for existing devices: Move from Windows 7 to modern Co-managed Windows 10 in a jiffy using ConfigMgr

Introduction

Lately I have been preparing our own shift from old school device provisioning with PXE and ConfigMgr, to the modern alternative with Windows AutoPilot. The preparation is two folded, where the mindset of the IT pros working with the technologies needs a shift, but obviously also the technologies and features involved.

We’ve been hitting F12 and preparing devices within IT for many years and while it’s easy to persuade IT pros into using new and exciting technologies, the businesses we serve also needs maturing. We are not quite there yet, but we are getting closer, and the first step is obviously to embrace the technology and start using it.

We don’t have any devices running Windows 7 in our environment (phew), but this is an approach that can be used with previous versions of Windows 10 as well. For example when moving from 1803 to 1809.

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Windows as a Service: Remind users of pending Windows upgrades using Windows toast notifications, part 3

Introduction

This will be a small but exciting contribution to my ‘Windows as a Service’ series!

The usual story here is, that everyone wants to add more user-friendliness to the whole experience around Windows Servicing.

End-users generally doesn’t care about new versions of Windows and they also, generally speaking, find interruptions in their work annoying, especially if those interruptions come unexpected.

So we come up with clever solutions to solve those problems and this will be an addition to that; remind the user with a big nice Windows toast notification when a Windows upgrade is pending. This is for the obvious reminder, but also to lure the end-user into a voluntary participation.

Find some of my previous WaaS posts here:

Part 1: https://www.imab.dk/windows-as-a-service-sharing-my-precache-and-in-place-upgrade-task-sequences-part-1/
Part 2: https://www.imab.dk/windows-as-a-service-sharing-my-precache-and-in-place-upgrade-task-sequences-part-2/

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Windows as a Service: Sharing my PreCache and In-Place Upgrade Task Sequences, part 2

Introduction

This is an extremely hot topic and I do know that we have some awesome OSD experts out there sharing their content already (Gary BlokMike Terrill etc.).  Now, their content is way superior to mine and probably suit a lot of needs already, but I think that content around WaaS in particular is interesting and especially when sharing how one does Windows Servicing in details.

So, this is me doing just that – sharing my precaching and in-place upgrade task sequences – in details. This will be a lengthy post, so grab a good cup of coffee 🙂

Also, this is based on a mid-size company in Denmark and we don’t manage thousands and thousands of devices. WaaS is a small part of my daily job and I’m the only one doing it, so the time and effort put into this is reflecting the size of the company and the resources available, but is still done with an eye on the detail. With that being said, some of the stuff I do here is done with inspiration from how some of the mentioned people does it (credit where due during the posts). If you find yourself in similar position or just need some more inspiration – then this will be for you 🙂

Part 1: https://www.imab.dk/windows-as-a-service-sharing-my-precache-and-in-place-upgrade-task-sequences-part-1/

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Windows as a Service: Sharing my PreCache and In-Place Upgrade Task Sequences, part 1

Introduction

This is an extremely hot topic and I do know that we have some awesome OSD experts out there sharing their content already (Gary Blok, Mike Terrill etc.).  Now, their content is way superior to mine and probably satisfy a lot of needs already, but I think that content around WaaS in particular is interesting and especially when sharing how one does Windows Servicing in details.

So, this is me doing just that – sharing my precaching and in-place upgrade task sequences – in details. This will be a lengthy post, so grab a good cup of coffee 🙂

Also, this is based on a mid-size company in Denmark and we don’t manage thousands and thousands of devices. WaaS is a small part of my daily job and I’m the only one doing it, so the time and effort put into this is reflecting the size of the company and the resources available, but is still done with an eye on the detail. With that being said, some of the stuff I do here is done with inspiration from how some of the mentioned people does it (credit where due during the posts). If you find yourself in similar position or just need some more inspiration – then this will be for you 🙂

Part 2: https://www.imab.dk/windows-as-a-service-sharing-my-precache-and-in-place-upgrade-task-sequences-part-2/

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Install RSAT (Remote Server Administration Tools) for Windows 10 v1809 using Microsoft Intune

Introduction

I don’t know if this will have many uses, but I did a similar post on how to deploy RSAT for Windows 10 v1809 using SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager) back in October when 1809 was initially released. As most people know by now, RSAT is no longer a separate downloadable add on to Windows, but something which is included as “Features on Demand” in the OS itself.

For your convenience, find my previous post here: https://www.imab.dk/deploy-rsat-remote-server-administration-tools-for-windows-10-v1809-using-sccm-system-center-configuration-manager/)

What if you don’t have SCCM and instead are fancying Microsoft Intune for software deployments? You might even run SCCM and Microsoft Intune Co-Management and like to do stuff differently and experimenting like I do? Then this post will be for you 🙂

Company Portal displaying my RSAT 1809 Win32 app (Sorry for the obscure language (Danish). Company portal insists on being in Danish on my computer)

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Flipping the switch, part 5: A closer look on the client apps workload (Co-management with SCCM and Intune)

Introduction

The client apps workload (also known as mobile apps for co-managed devices) was introduced in System Center Configuration Manager 1806 and was done so as a pre-release feature. The documentation on the workload is today still somewhat lacking, so I figured I’d give you some more insights based on my own findings.

The main idea here is, that apps deployed from Microsoft Intune are available through the Company Portal, and apps deployed from SCCM are available through the Software Center. This is quoted directly from the documentation, but what does this really mean? What types of apps are we able to deploy from Microsoft Intune and what’s the expected behavior? This is something I will try to address in this post. Curious? Read on 🙂

Apps installed from Microsoft Intune to a Co-managed device. Sorry about the obscure language. The company portal on my computer insists on being in Danish 🙁

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Convert and deploy .MSIX applications using SCCM 1810 (System Center Configuration Manager)

Introduction

The ability to deploy .MSIX files has been available since System Center Configuration Manager 1806. Starting with 1810, we now also have the option to convert existing .MSI applications into .MSIX. Exciting! MSIX is told to be the future of software packaging, so getting a better understanding of how it works, and how it works with SCCM 1810 in particular, is not a bad idea.

So let’s walk through the entire process of converting an existing application, how to digitally sign the application and in the end, how to deploy the application. Curious? Read on 🙂

My first .MSIX application in the Software Center

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How to automatically join Windows AutoPilot devices to On-Premises AD (Hybrid Azure AD Join)

Introduction

Good news everyone! The feature was introduced at Ignite earlier this year and now it’s finally here. Windows AutoPilot now allows you to join your Windows 10 v1809 devices to your on-premises Active Directory (Hybrid Azure AD Join). All the magic lies in a new Intune connector for Active Directory. Sounds exciting, right? This will be everything you need to know, on how to get started with this new amazing feature.

The new Intune Connector for Active Directory (Preview)

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Remove built-in apps for Windows 10 using SCCM and Microsoft Store for Business

Introduction

Removing the built-in apps in Windows 10 is often a hot topic and in same regard, it’s often discussed if and how they are removed. There are several excellent Powershell scripts for the same purpose made by the community, and they possibly satisfy most needs already.

But maybe you don’t fancy maintaining a Powershell script and maybe you don’t want to deal with specific apps coming back after an in-place upgrade. Or perhaps you just want an alternative. Then this might be of interest. This is solely based on using Microsoft Store for Business integrated with SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager), to uninstall some of the unwanted built-in apps in Windows 10 (and keep them uninstalled shall they ever return)

Some of the apps I tend to remove and keep removed using this method 🙂

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