KB3025417 breaks SCEP reporting (and the solution)

Beginning of June I had my ways with a problem in SCCM/SCEP and the update KB3025417.

I did what I usually do in those situations. I went to the forums, and created following thread: Here!

After fighting with MS 1st line support and not really getting anywhere, then sudden following blog pops up at the ConfigMgr team: Here!

They came up with an alternative solution, which is what I was looking for. However, running W81 x64 and looking to push the mentioned script using ConfigMgr, comes with following obstacles:

  • Packages in SCCM is being launched as a 32bit process. (This is what most people would use, considering that it’s a script and most would use .bat/cmd)
  • The provided script cannot run under a 32bit process. (I learned so the hard way. I confirmed that the script worked when run manually. I took it for granted that it worked as a SCCM package as well – it doesn’t)

So the solution to this is either of following:

  • Use the application model. (Not really prefered in this case, as it requires a detection method)
  • Trick the file x64 redirection to run cmd.exe from %SystemRoot%\Sysnative

An example of the last mentioned solution could be this batch script:

“C:\Windows\Sysnative\cmd.exe” /c “%~dp064bit.bat” (This coming from a x86 process, will run 64bit.bat in a x64 context instead)

64bit.bat will then contain the original script.

Debug and view Windows .dmp files.

Quick and short post.

Nowadays if a BSOD happens in Windows, the OS automatically restarts the system. The users in an enterprise never notice that an BSOD just occured, but will find their computer automatically rebooting and as a result hereof, the users calls the helpdesk.

If a BSOD just happened, windows will log the errors in .dmp files. Typical location is %SystemRoot%\MEMORY.DMP

To view the .dmp files, you will need  the Windows Software Development Kit (SDK). This one is for Windows 8.1: https://msdn.microsoft.com/da-DK/windows/desktop/bg162891

Following the SDK, comes windbg.exe. This is the tool that allows you to view the content of the .dmp files.

Before opening any .dmp files, you will need to specify a symbol search path. You do so by launching WinDbg and click File -> Symbol File Path.

Insert following path: SRV*C:\Symbols*http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbols

(Replace the text in bold with your preffered location for the symbols)

More on the symbols: http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/311503